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Simple Mould Facts

10 Things You Should Know About Mould
  1.  Exposure to elevated levels of molds can cause health problems in sensitive individuals, such as respiratory problems and sinus problems, cold and flu-like symptoms, headaches, fatigue, trouble concentrating, and memory loss. Those most susceptible include young children, the elderly, those with compromised immune systems, and persons with pre-existing respiratory conditions.
  2. There are many molds that have the potential to cause health problems including Alternaria, Aspergillus, Chaetomium, Cladosporium, Fusarium, Penicillium, and Stachybotrys. (Just because you can't pronounce it doesn't mean it can't cause problems.)
  3. Mold spores can cause health problems even if the spores are dead.
  4. Mold requires an organic food source, such as cloth, sheet rock, or wood, and a moisture source to grow. Mold can begin to grow if any organic material remains wet for more than 48 hours. The way to control mold growth indoors is to control moisture indoors.
  5. Mold spores are very common outdoors and there is no practical way to eliminate all mold spores indoors.
  6. Molds can grow undetected inside wall spaces, under carpet, and inside HVAC systems.
  7. Mold growth can often be the visible sign of a structural defect that allows moisture to intrude into a building.
  8. When doing mold abatement, it is first necessary to find and eliminate the moisture source. If the moisture problem is not resolved, the mold growth will return.
  9. Cleanup of large areas of mold growth can cause airborne levels of spores to increase up to 10,000 times that of background levels resulting in acute exposure to those doing the cleanup if personal protective equipment is not worn.
  10. The best way to abate mold growth indoors is to remove the impacted materials. Cleaning the surface of a material with mold growth may not always kill the mold, especially if mold is growing on porous materials like sheet rock or carpeting.

10 Things You Should Remember About Molds:
  1. Mold spores are everywhere outdoors. There is no practical way to eliminate all mold spores indoors.
  2. Exposure to elevated levels of mold can cause serious health problem.
  3. There are many molds that have the potential to cause health problems: Alternaria, Aspergillus, Chaetomium, Cladosporium, Fusarium, Penicillium, Stachybotrys.
  4. Molds spores can cause health problems even if the spores are dead.
  5. Mold requires an organic food source, such as cloth, sheetrock, wood, and moisture source to grow. Mold can begin to grow if any organic material that remains wet for more than 48 hours. The way to control mold growth indoors is to control moisture indoors.
  6. Molds can grow undetected inside wall spaces, under carpet and inside HVAC.
  7. Mold growth can often be the visible sign of a structural defect that allows moisture to intrude into a building.
  8. If the moisture problem is not resolved, the mold growth will return.
  9. Cleanup of large areas of mold growth can cause airborne levels of spores to increase up to 10,000 times.
  10. The best way to abate mold growth indoors is to remove the impacted materials.
Ten Things You Should Know About Treating Mold
  1. Mold requires four conditions to grow and flourish: moisture, a food source, warm temperatures and receptive surface.
  2. Almost all single cell microbes, including mold, bacteria, algae, and fungi are negatively charged.
  3. The Microbe Guard Antimicrobials molecularly change the surface on any substrate that they are applied to, creating a positively charged polymer surface that kills mold, bacteria, algae and fungi and contact. This new surface electromagnetically draws microbes to its surface and kills mold and mold spores.
  4. Potential health effects and symptoms associated with mold exposures include allergic reactions, asthma, and other respiratory complaints.
  5. The most practical way to eliminate mold and mold spores in the indoor environment is to control moisture.
  6. If mold is a problem in your home or school, you must clean up the mold and eliminate sources of moisture.
  7. Reduce indoor humidity (to 30-60% ) to decrease mold growth:
          Vent bathrooms, dryers, and other moisture-generating sources to the outside.
          Use air conditioners and de-humidifiers.
          Increase ventilation.
          Use exhaust fans whenever cooking, dishwashing or cleaning.
  8. Clean and dry any damp or wet building materials and furnishings within 24-48 hours to prevent mold growth. Clean mold off hard surfaces with water and detergent and dry completely. Absorbent materials that are moldy, such as ceiling tiles, may need to be replaced.
  9. Prevent condensation by reducing the potential for condensation on cold surfaces by adding insulation (e.g., around windows, piping, exterior walls, roof, or floors). In areas where there is a perpetual moisture problem, do not install carpeting (e.g., by drinking fountains, by classroom sinks or on concrete floors with leaks or frequent condensation).
  10. Molds can be found almost anywhere--they can grow on virtually any substance, providing moisture is present. There are molds that can grow on wood, paper, carpet and foods.

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